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The cW Agenda: Spring 2023
2023 cw agenda
All the news you need to know.

8.

Slow it Down: Findings by an international team of researchers published in the journal Nature show that cancer cells move faster when surrounded by thicker fluids. When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes, lymph drainage and draining patterns are affected, thus causing thicker fluids in some cases. Knowing this information, drugs can potentially be used to short-circuit the signaling pathway and encourage cancer cells to slow down or possibly stop, providing a new way to hopefully stop metastasis.

9.

A Great Fall: The American Association for Cancer Research’s annual Cancer Progress Report has found that death rates from cancer have been falling over the past two decades, and sharply in recent years. There are now over 18 million cancer thrivers in the U.S., a number credited to the growing use of immunotherapies and early detection.

7.

Bundle of Positivity: Worried about pregnancy after breast cancer? Results from a new study called the POSITIVE trial showed that women who paused protective post-cancer therapies to get pregnant had no increased risk of their cancer returning. The study followed 518 women who were ages 42 or younger and had early-stage breast cancer (up to stage III), who paused their endocrine therapy for around two years while trying to get pregnant. The study showed that the breast cancer recurrence rate was 8.9% within an average follow-up period of 3.5 years.

8.

Slow it Down: Findings by an international team of researchers published in the journal Nature show that cancer cells move faster when surrounded by thicker fluids. When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes, lymph drainage and draining patterns are affected, thus causing thicker fluids in some cases. Knowing this information, drugs can potentially be used to short-circuit the signaling pathway and encourage cancer cells to slow down or possibly stop, providing a new way to hopefully stop metastasis.

9.

A Great Fall: The American Association for Cancer Research’s annual Cancer Progress Report has found that death rates from cancer have been falling over the past two decades, and sharply in recent years. There are now over 18 million cancer thrivers in the U.S., a number credited to the growing use of immunotherapies and early detection.

6.

Canine Companions: Dogs are not only our best friends but might also be able to help us fight cancer. Dogs diagnosed with naturally developing cancers are being enrolled in clinical trials, called comparative oncology, so that doctors can use what they learn to speed potential treatments for both dogs and humans. Because certain breeds have been bred to have specific traits, it’s easier to study genes in dogs, and because we share many similar genes with dogs, scientists are hoping these studies will lead to a better understanding of cancers in both species.

7.

Bundle of Positivity: Worried about pregnancy after breast cancer? Results from a new study called the POSITIVE trial showed that women who paused protective post-cancer therapies to get pregnant had no increased risk of their cancer returning. The study followed 518 women who were ages 42 or younger and had early-stage breast cancer (up to stage III), who paused their endocrine therapy for around two years while trying to get pregnant. The study showed that the breast cancer recurrence rate was 8.9% within an average follow-up period of 3.5 years.

8.

Slow it Down: Findings by an international team of researchers published in the journal Nature show that cancer cells move faster when surrounded by thicker fluids. When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes, lymph drainage and draining patterns are affected, thus causing thicker fluids in some cases. Knowing this information, drugs can potentially be used to short-circuit the signaling pathway and encourage cancer cells to slow down or possibly stop, providing a new way to hopefully stop metastasis.

9.

A Great Fall: The American Association for Cancer Research’s annual Cancer Progress Report has found that death rates from cancer have been falling over the past two decades, and sharply in recent years. There are now over 18 million cancer thrivers in the U.S., a number credited to the growing use of immunotherapies and early detection.

5.

Genetically Bound: At the University of Tokyo, scientists are developing an artificial “hairpin-like” DNA molecule that can target and kill cancer cells. It works by binding mRNA molecules that are overproduced in certain cancers. This new method was effective in lab tests against human cervical cancer and breast cancer-derived cells, as well as malignant melanoma cells in mice. These results will hopefully give way to new options for mRNA-related drug development and medication policies.

6.

Canine Companions: Dogs are not only our best friends but might also be able to help us fight cancer. Dogs diagnosed with naturally developing cancers are being enrolled in clinical trials, called comparative oncology, so that doctors can use what they learn to speed potential treatments for both dogs and humans. Because certain breeds have been bred to have specific traits, it’s easier to study genes in dogs, and because we share many similar genes with dogs, scientists are hoping these studies will lead to a better understanding of cancers in both species.

7.

Bundle of Positivity: Worried about pregnancy after breast cancer? Results from a new study called the POSITIVE trial showed that women who paused protective post-cancer therapies to get pregnant had no increased risk of their cancer returning. The study followed 518 women who were ages 42 or younger and had early-stage breast cancer (up to stage III), who paused their endocrine therapy for around two years while trying to get pregnant. The study showed that the breast cancer recurrence rate was 8.9% within an average follow-up period of 3.5 years.

8.

Slow it Down: Findings by an international team of researchers published in the journal Nature show that cancer cells move faster when surrounded by thicker fluids. When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes, lymph drainage and draining patterns are affected, thus causing thicker fluids in some cases. Knowing this information, drugs can potentially be used to short-circuit the signaling pathway and encourage cancer cells to slow down or possibly stop, providing a new way to hopefully stop metastasis.

9.

A Great Fall: The American Association for Cancer Research’s annual Cancer Progress Report has found that death rates from cancer have been falling over the past two decades, and sharply in recent years. There are now over 18 million cancer thrivers in the U.S., a number credited to the growing use of immunotherapies and early detection.

4.

Light it Up: The FDA has approved Cytalux, a fluorescent imaging agent that lights up cancer cells for easier detection and helps surgeons find and remove lung cancer cells without damaging healthy tissue. This prescription medication was first approved to detect ovarian cancer during surgery and will now be allowed for additional uses. Cytalux is administered to lung cancer patients via intravenous injection prior to surgery.

5.

Genetically Bound: At the University of Tokyo, scientists are developing an artificial “hairpin-like” DNA molecule that can target and kill cancer cells. It works by binding mRNA molecules that are overproduced in certain cancers. This new method was effective in lab tests against human cervical cancer and breast cancer-derived cells, as well as malignant melanoma cells in mice. These results will hopefully give way to new options for mRNA-related drug development and medication policies.

6.

Canine Companions: Dogs are not only our best friends but might also be able to help us fight cancer. Dogs diagnosed with naturally developing cancers are being enrolled in clinical trials, called comparative oncology, so that doctors can use what they learn to speed potential treatments for both dogs and humans. Because certain breeds have been bred to have specific traits, it’s easier to study genes in dogs, and because we share many similar genes with dogs, scientists are hoping these studies will lead to a better understanding of cancers in both species.

7.

Bundle of Positivity: Worried about pregnancy after breast cancer? Results from a new study called the POSITIVE trial showed that women who paused protective post-cancer therapies to get pregnant had no increased risk of their cancer returning. The study followed 518 women who were ages 42 or younger and had early-stage breast cancer (up to stage III), who paused their endocrine therapy for around two years while trying to get pregnant. The study showed that the breast cancer recurrence rate was 8.9% within an average follow-up period of 3.5 years.

8.

Slow it Down: Findings by an international team of researchers published in the journal Nature show that cancer cells move faster when surrounded by thicker fluids. When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes, lymph drainage and draining patterns are affected, thus causing thicker fluids in some cases. Knowing this information, drugs can potentially be used to short-circuit the signaling pathway and encourage cancer cells to slow down or possibly stop, providing a new way to hopefully stop metastasis.

9.

A Great Fall: The American Association for Cancer Research’s annual Cancer Progress Report has found that death rates from cancer have been falling over the past two decades, and sharply in recent years. There are now over 18 million cancer thrivers in the U.S., a number credited to the growing use of immunotherapies and early detection.

3.

Step into the Sun: Are you sick of the cold and gloomy weather this past winter? Your body might be, too. The absence of the sun can cause a deficiency in Vitamin D, which is synthesized in the skin after exposure to the sun’s UVB rays. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vitamin D is crucial for calcium absorption and maintaining healthy bones. Vitamin D can also play a role in inflammation, autoimmune disease risk, heart health, and cognitive function. As spring arrives, go out and get some sunlight.

4.

Light it Up: The FDA has approved Cytalux, a fluorescent imaging agent that lights up cancer cells for easier detection and helps surgeons find and remove lung cancer cells without damaging healthy tissue. This prescription medication was first approved to detect ovarian cancer during surgery and will now be allowed for additional uses. Cytalux is administered to lung cancer patients via intravenous injection prior to surgery.

5.

Genetically Bound: At the University of Tokyo, scientists are developing an artificial “hairpin-like” DNA molecule that can target and kill cancer cells. It works by binding mRNA molecules that are overproduced in certain cancers. This new method was effective in lab tests against human cervical cancer and breast cancer-derived cells, as well as malignant melanoma cells in mice. These results will hopefully give way to new options for mRNA-related drug development and medication policies.

6.

Canine Companions: Dogs are not only our best friends but might also be able to help us fight cancer. Dogs diagnosed with naturally developing cancers are being enrolled in clinical trials, called comparative oncology, so that doctors can use what they learn to speed potential treatments for both dogs and humans. Because certain breeds have been bred to have specific traits, it’s easier to study genes in dogs, and because we share many similar genes with dogs, scientists are hoping these studies will lead to a better understanding of cancers in both species.

7.

Bundle of Positivity: Worried about pregnancy after breast cancer? Results from a new study called the POSITIVE trial showed that women who paused protective post-cancer therapies to get pregnant had no increased risk of their cancer returning. The study followed 518 women who were ages 42 or younger and had early-stage breast cancer (up to stage III), who paused their endocrine therapy for around two years while trying to get pregnant. The study showed that the breast cancer recurrence rate was 8.9% within an average follow-up period of 3.5 years.

8.

Slow it Down: Findings by an international team of researchers published in the journal Nature show that cancer cells move faster when surrounded by thicker fluids. When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes, lymph drainage and draining patterns are affected, thus causing thicker fluids in some cases. Knowing this information, drugs can potentially be used to short-circuit the signaling pathway and encourage cancer cells to slow down or possibly stop, providing a new way to hopefully stop metastasis.

9.

A Great Fall: The American Association for Cancer Research’s annual Cancer Progress Report has found that death rates from cancer have been falling over the past two decades, and sharply in recent years. There are now over 18 million cancer thrivers in the U.S., a number credited to the growing use of immunotherapies and early detection.

2.

Dream Drug: Adstiladrin, the first gene therapy to treat high-risk, nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Clinical trials showed that 51% of enrolled patients saw the disappearance of all signs of cancer as seen on cystoscopy, biopsied tissue and urine samples.

3.

Step into the Sun: Are you sick of the cold and gloomy weather this past winter? Your body might be, too. The absence of the sun can cause a deficiency in Vitamin D, which is synthesized in the skin after exposure to the sun’s UVB rays. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vitamin D is crucial for calcium absorption and maintaining healthy bones. Vitamin D can also play a role in inflammation, autoimmune disease risk, heart health, and cognitive function. As spring arrives, go out and get some sunlight.

4.

Light it Up: The FDA has approved Cytalux, a fluorescent imaging agent that lights up cancer cells for easier detection and helps surgeons find and remove lung cancer cells without damaging healthy tissue. This prescription medication was first approved to detect ovarian cancer during surgery and will now be allowed for additional uses. Cytalux is administered to lung cancer patients via intravenous injection prior to surgery.

5.

Genetically Bound: At the University of Tokyo, scientists are developing an artificial “hairpin-like” DNA molecule that can target and kill cancer cells. It works by binding mRNA molecules that are overproduced in certain cancers. This new method was effective in lab tests against human cervical cancer and breast cancer-derived cells, as well as malignant melanoma cells in mice. These results will hopefully give way to new options for mRNA-related drug development and medication policies.

6.

Canine Companions: Dogs are not only our best friends but might also be able to help us fight cancer. Dogs diagnosed with naturally developing cancers are being enrolled in clinical trials, called comparative oncology, so that doctors can use what they learn to speed potential treatments for both dogs and humans. Because certain breeds have been bred to have specific traits, it’s easier to study genes in dogs, and because we share many similar genes with dogs, scientists are hoping these studies will lead to a better understanding of cancers in both species.

7.

Bundle of Positivity: Worried about pregnancy after breast cancer? Results from a new study called the POSITIVE trial showed that women who paused protective post-cancer therapies to get pregnant had no increased risk of their cancer returning. The study followed 518 women who were ages 42 or younger and had early-stage breast cancer (up to stage III), who paused their endocrine therapy for around two years while trying to get pregnant. The study showed that the breast cancer recurrence rate was 8.9% within an average follow-up period of 3.5 years.

8.

Slow it Down: Findings by an international team of researchers published in the journal Nature show that cancer cells move faster when surrounded by thicker fluids. When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes, lymph drainage and draining patterns are affected, thus causing thicker fluids in some cases. Knowing this information, drugs can potentially be used to short-circuit the signaling pathway and encourage cancer cells to slow down or possibly stop, providing a new way to hopefully stop metastasis.

9.

A Great Fall: The American Association for Cancer Research’s annual Cancer Progress Report has found that death rates from cancer have been falling over the past two decades, and sharply in recent years. There are now over 18 million cancer thrivers in the U.S., a number credited to the growing use of immunotherapies and early detection.

1.

Tumor Tag: Cambridge scientists identified different cancer cell types in a breast tumor by using viruses to tag each type of cancer cell with a unique genetic barcode. This identifies the different types and quantity of cancer cells in the tumor, their characteristics and which types of cancer cells are not killed effectively by standard cancer treatments. By using this technology, scientists could specifically target and kill tumor cells that evaded chemotherapy in lymphoblastic leukemia.

2.

Dream Drug: Adstiladrin, the first gene therapy to treat high-risk, nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Clinical trials showed that 51% of enrolled patients saw the disappearance of all signs of cancer as seen on cystoscopy, biopsied tissue and urine samples.

3.

Step into the Sun: Are you sick of the cold and gloomy weather this past winter? Your body might be, too. The absence of the sun can cause a deficiency in Vitamin D, which is synthesized in the skin after exposure to the sun’s UVB rays. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vitamin D is crucial for calcium absorption and maintaining healthy bones. Vitamin D can also play a role in inflammation, autoimmune disease risk, heart health, and cognitive function. As spring arrives, go out and get some sunlight.

4.

Light it Up: The FDA has approved Cytalux, a fluorescent imaging agent that lights up cancer cells for easier detection and helps surgeons find and remove lung cancer cells without damaging healthy tissue. This prescription medication was first approved to detect ovarian cancer during surgery and will now be allowed for additional uses. Cytalux is administered to lung cancer patients via intravenous injection prior to surgery.

5.

Genetically Bound: At the University of Tokyo, scientists are developing an artificial “hairpin-like” DNA molecule that can target and kill cancer cells. It works by binding mRNA molecules that are overproduced in certain cancers. This new method was effective in lab tests against human cervical cancer and breast cancer-derived cells, as well as malignant melanoma cells in mice. These results will hopefully give way to new options for mRNA-related drug development and medication policies.

6.

Canine Companions: Dogs are not only our best friends but might also be able to help us fight cancer. Dogs diagnosed with naturally developing cancers are being enrolled in clinical trials, called comparative oncology, so that doctors can use what they learn to speed potential treatments for both dogs and humans. Because certain breeds have been bred to have specific traits, it’s easier to study genes in dogs, and because we share many similar genes with dogs, scientists are hoping these studies will lead to a better understanding of cancers in both species.

7.

Bundle of Positivity: Worried about pregnancy after breast cancer? Results from a new study called the POSITIVE trial showed that women who paused protective post-cancer therapies to get pregnant had no increased risk of their cancer returning. The study followed 518 women who were ages 42 or younger and had early-stage breast cancer (up to stage III), who paused their endocrine therapy for around two years while trying to get pregnant. The study showed that the breast cancer recurrence rate was 8.9% within an average follow-up period of 3.5 years.

8.

Slow it Down: Findings by an international team of researchers published in the journal Nature show that cancer cells move faster when surrounded by thicker fluids. When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes, lymph drainage and draining patterns are affected, thus causing thicker fluids in some cases. Knowing this information, drugs can potentially be used to short-circuit the signaling pathway and encourage cancer cells to slow down or possibly stop, providing a new way to hopefully stop metastasis.

9.

A Great Fall: The American Association for Cancer Research’s annual Cancer Progress Report has found that death rates from cancer have been falling over the past two decades, and sharply in recent years. There are now over 18 million cancer thrivers in the U.S., a number credited to the growing use of immunotherapies and early detection.

1.

Tumor Tag: Cambridge scientists identified different cancer cell types in a breast tumor by using viruses to tag each type of cancer cell with a unique genetic barcode. This identifies the different types and quantity of cancer cells in the tumor, their characteristics and which types of cancer cells are not killed effectively by standard cancer treatments. By using this technology, scientists could specifically target and kill tumor cells that evaded chemotherapy in lymphoblastic leukemia.

2.

Dream Drug: Adstiladrin, the first gene therapy to treat high-risk, nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Clinical trials showed that 51% of enrolled patients saw the disappearance of all signs of cancer as seen on cystoscopy, biopsied tissue and urine samples.

3.

Step into the Sun: Are you sick of the cold and gloomy weather this past winter? Your body might be, too. The absence of the sun can cause a deficiency in Vitamin D, which is synthesized in the skin after exposure to the sun’s UVB rays. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vitamin D is crucial for calcium absorption and maintaining healthy bones. Vitamin D can also play a role in inflammation, autoimmune disease risk, heart health, and cognitive function. As spring arrives, go out and get some sunlight.

4.

Light it Up: The FDA has approved Cytalux, a fluorescent imaging agent that lights up cancer cells for easier detection and helps surgeons find and remove lung cancer cells without damaging healthy tissue. This prescription medication was first approved to detect ovarian cancer during surgery and will now be allowed for additional uses. Cytalux is administered to lung cancer patients via intravenous injection prior to surgery.

5.

Genetically Bound: At the University of Tokyo, scientists are developing an artificial “hairpin-like” DNA molecule that can target and kill cancer cells. It works by binding mRNA molecules that are overproduced in certain cancers. This new method was effective in lab tests against human cervical cancer and breast cancer-derived cells, as well as malignant melanoma cells in mice. These results will hopefully give way to new options for mRNA-related drug development and medication policies.

6.

Canine Companions: Dogs are not only our best friends but might also be able to help us fight cancer. Dogs diagnosed with naturally developing cancers are being enrolled in clinical trials, called comparative oncology, so that doctors can use what they learn to speed potential treatments for both dogs and humans. Because certain breeds have been bred to have specific traits, it’s easier to study genes in dogs, and because we share many similar genes with dogs, scientists are hoping these studies will lead to a better understanding of cancers in both species.

7.

Bundle of Positivity: Worried about pregnancy after breast cancer? Results from a new study called the POSITIVE trial showed that women who paused protective post-cancer therapies to get pregnant had no increased risk of their cancer returning. The study followed 518 women who were ages 42 or younger and had early-stage breast cancer (up to stage III), who paused their endocrine therapy for around two years while trying to get pregnant. The study showed that the breast cancer recurrence rate was 8.9% within an average follow-up period of 3.5 years.

8.

Slow it Down: Findings by an international team of researchers published in the journal Nature show that cancer cells move faster when surrounded by thicker fluids. When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes, lymph drainage and draining patterns are affected, thus causing thicker fluids in some cases. Knowing this information, drugs can potentially be used to short-circuit the signaling pathway and encourage cancer cells to slow down or possibly stop, providing a new way to hopefully stop metastasis.

9.

A Great Fall: The American Association for Cancer Research’s annual Cancer Progress Report has found that death rates from cancer have been falling over the past two decades, and sharply in recent years. There are now over 18 million cancer thrivers in the U.S., a number credited to the growing use of immunotherapies and early detection.

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