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The cW Agenda: Summer 2022
summer 2022 agenda
All the news you need to know.

8.

Scaling Back: Lung cancer is extremely common but also prone to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. A new model, detailed in the journal Cancer Biomarkers, aims to better identify high-risk and low-risk tumors through MRI and CT scan data.

9.

Bugging Out: Bees, worms, ants—all of these creepy crawlies can help fight cancer. Numerous studies are focusing on bees’ honey as well as worms’ and ants’ sense of smell to detect and treat different cancer types.

7.

On the Rise: Typically seen in older demographics, esophageal cancer cases in those aged 45 to 64 have nearly doubled since 2012. Symptoms usually arise later, but look out for difficulty swallowing, coughing and heartburn.

8.

Scaling Back: Lung cancer is extremely common but also prone to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. A new model, detailed in the journal Cancer Biomarkers, aims to better identify high-risk and low-risk tumors through MRI and CT scan data.

9.

Bugging Out: Bees, worms, ants—all of these creepy crawlies can help fight cancer. Numerous studies are focusing on bees’ honey as well as worms’ and ants’ sense of smell to detect and treat different cancer types.

6.

Oh, Baby: If you’re a woman who experienced childhood cancer and are hoping to conceive, good news! The Journal of the National Cancer Institute has published a study determining that the likelihood of having a healthy baby is the same as any other non-warrior.

7.

On the Rise: Typically seen in older demographics, esophageal cancer cases in those aged 45 to 64 have nearly doubled since 2012. Symptoms usually arise later, but look out for difficulty swallowing, coughing and heartburn.

8.

Scaling Back: Lung cancer is extremely common but also prone to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. A new model, detailed in the journal Cancer Biomarkers, aims to better identify high-risk and low-risk tumors through MRI and CT scan data.

9.

Bugging Out: Bees, worms, ants—all of these creepy crawlies can help fight cancer. Numerous studies are focusing on bees’ honey as well as worms’ and ants’ sense of smell to detect and treat different cancer types.

5.

A Leading Light: A new study in the Journal of Biological and Medical Rhythm Research found that customizing light therapy for breast cancer patients can improve warriors’ sleep quality and combat fatigue. Let there be light!

6.

Oh, Baby: If you’re a woman who experienced childhood cancer and are hoping to conceive, good news! The Journal of the National Cancer Institute has published a study determining that the likelihood of having a healthy baby is the same as any other non-warrior.

7.

On the Rise: Typically seen in older demographics, esophageal cancer cases in those aged 45 to 64 have nearly doubled since 2012. Symptoms usually arise later, but look out for difficulty swallowing, coughing and heartburn.

8.

Scaling Back: Lung cancer is extremely common but also prone to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. A new model, detailed in the journal Cancer Biomarkers, aims to better identify high-risk and low-risk tumors through MRI and CT scan data.

9.

Bugging Out: Bees, worms, ants—all of these creepy crawlies can help fight cancer. Numerous studies are focusing on bees’ honey as well as worms’ and ants’ sense of smell to detect and treat different cancer types.

4.

The Eye of AI: A study in Cancer Biomarkers is further revealing the power of artificial intelligence. An AI tool was able to capture and quantify small, early signs of pancreatic cancer just by analyzing a patient’s CT scans.

5.

A Leading Light: A new study in the Journal of Biological and Medical Rhythm Research found that customizing light therapy for breast cancer patients can improve warriors’ sleep quality and combat fatigue. Let there be light!

6.

Oh, Baby: If you’re a woman who experienced childhood cancer and are hoping to conceive, good news! The Journal of the National Cancer Institute has published a study determining that the likelihood of having a healthy baby is the same as any other non-warrior.

7.

On the Rise: Typically seen in older demographics, esophageal cancer cases in those aged 45 to 64 have nearly doubled since 2012. Symptoms usually arise later, but look out for difficulty swallowing, coughing and heartburn.

8.

Scaling Back: Lung cancer is extremely common but also prone to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. A new model, detailed in the journal Cancer Biomarkers, aims to better identify high-risk and low-risk tumors through MRI and CT scan data.

9.

Bugging Out: Bees, worms, ants—all of these creepy crawlies can help fight cancer. Numerous studies are focusing on bees’ honey as well as worms’ and ants’ sense of smell to detect and treat different cancer types.

3.

Patchwork: Feeling queasy? Sancuso can help. The company behind the first and only FDA-approved prescription patch for nausea and vomiting in chemo patients recently solidified a partnership to offer the patch throughout most of the U.S.

4.

The Eye of AI: A study in Cancer Biomarkers is further revealing the power of artificial intelligence. An AI tool was able to capture and quantify small, early signs of pancreatic cancer just by analyzing a patient’s CT scans.

5.

A Leading Light: A new study in the Journal of Biological and Medical Rhythm Research found that customizing light therapy for breast cancer patients can improve warriors’ sleep quality and combat fatigue. Let there be light!

6.

Oh, Baby: If you’re a woman who experienced childhood cancer and are hoping to conceive, good news! The Journal of the National Cancer Institute has published a study determining that the likelihood of having a healthy baby is the same as any other non-warrior.

7.

On the Rise: Typically seen in older demographics, esophageal cancer cases in those aged 45 to 64 have nearly doubled since 2012. Symptoms usually arise later, but look out for difficulty swallowing, coughing and heartburn.

8.

Scaling Back: Lung cancer is extremely common but also prone to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. A new model, detailed in the journal Cancer Biomarkers, aims to better identify high-risk and low-risk tumors through MRI and CT scan data.

9.

Bugging Out: Bees, worms, ants—all of these creepy crawlies can help fight cancer. Numerous studies are focusing on bees’ honey as well as worms’ and ants’ sense of smell to detect and treat different cancer types.

2.

A New Lifeline: A Cedars-Sinai Cancer study has shown that a new combination therapy extends the lives of men living with prostate cancer. When used together, androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic lymph node radiation kept almost 90 percent of patients’ prostate cancer at bay for five years.

3.

Patchwork: Feeling queasy? Sancuso can help. The company behind the first and only FDA-approved prescription patch for nausea and vomiting in chemo patients recently solidified a partnership to offer the patch throughout most of the U.S.

4.

The Eye of AI: A study in Cancer Biomarkers is further revealing the power of artificial intelligence. An AI tool was able to capture and quantify small, early signs of pancreatic cancer just by analyzing a patient’s CT scans.

5.

A Leading Light: A new study in the Journal of Biological and Medical Rhythm Research found that customizing light therapy for breast cancer patients can improve warriors’ sleep quality and combat fatigue. Let there be light!

6.

Oh, Baby: If you’re a woman who experienced childhood cancer and are hoping to conceive, good news! The Journal of the National Cancer Institute has published a study determining that the likelihood of having a healthy baby is the same as any other non-warrior.

7.

On the Rise: Typically seen in older demographics, esophageal cancer cases in those aged 45 to 64 have nearly doubled since 2012. Symptoms usually arise later, but look out for difficulty swallowing, coughing and heartburn.

8.

Scaling Back: Lung cancer is extremely common but also prone to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. A new model, detailed in the journal Cancer Biomarkers, aims to better identify high-risk and low-risk tumors through MRI and CT scan data.

9.

Bugging Out: Bees, worms, ants—all of these creepy crawlies can help fight cancer. Numerous studies are focusing on bees’ honey as well as worms’ and ants’ sense of smell to detect and treat different cancer types.

1.

Perilous Pairing: A new study in Nature Cell Biology has revealed a link between type 2 diabetes and breast cancer, highlighting a need for breast cancer screening and diabetes screening to go hand in hand.

2.

A New Lifeline: A Cedars-Sinai Cancer study has shown that a new combination therapy extends the lives of men living with prostate cancer. When used together, androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic lymph node radiation kept almost 90 percent of patients’ prostate cancer at bay for five years.

3.

Patchwork: Feeling queasy? Sancuso can help. The company behind the first and only FDA-approved prescription patch for nausea and vomiting in chemo patients recently solidified a partnership to offer the patch throughout most of the U.S.

4.

The Eye of AI: A study in Cancer Biomarkers is further revealing the power of artificial intelligence. An AI tool was able to capture and quantify small, early signs of pancreatic cancer just by analyzing a patient’s CT scans.

5.

A Leading Light: A new study in the Journal of Biological and Medical Rhythm Research found that customizing light therapy for breast cancer patients can improve warriors’ sleep quality and combat fatigue. Let there be light!

6.

Oh, Baby: If you’re a woman who experienced childhood cancer and are hoping to conceive, good news! The Journal of the National Cancer Institute has published a study determining that the likelihood of having a healthy baby is the same as any other non-warrior.

7.

On the Rise: Typically seen in older demographics, esophageal cancer cases in those aged 45 to 64 have nearly doubled since 2012. Symptoms usually arise later, but look out for difficulty swallowing, coughing and heartburn.

8.

Scaling Back: Lung cancer is extremely common but also prone to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. A new model, detailed in the journal Cancer Biomarkers, aims to better identify high-risk and low-risk tumors through MRI and CT scan data.

9.

Bugging Out: Bees, worms, ants—all of these creepy crawlies can help fight cancer. Numerous studies are focusing on bees’ honey as well as worms’ and ants’ sense of smell to detect and treat different cancer types.

1.

Perilous Pairing: A new study in Nature Cell Biology has revealed a link between type 2 diabetes and breast cancer, highlighting a need for breast cancer screening and diabetes screening to go hand in hand.

2.

A New Lifeline: A Cedars-Sinai Cancer study has shown that a new combination therapy extends the lives of men living with prostate cancer. When used together, androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic lymph node radiation kept almost 90 percent of patients’ prostate cancer at bay for five years.

3.

Patchwork: Feeling queasy? Sancuso can help. The company behind the first and only FDA-approved prescription patch for nausea and vomiting in chemo patients recently solidified a partnership to offer the patch throughout most of the U.S.

4.

The Eye of AI: A study in Cancer Biomarkers is further revealing the power of artificial intelligence. An AI tool was able to capture and quantify small, early signs of pancreatic cancer just by analyzing a patient’s CT scans.

5.

A Leading Light: A new study in the Journal of Biological and Medical Rhythm Research found that customizing light therapy for breast cancer patients can improve warriors’ sleep quality and combat fatigue. Let there be light!

6.

Oh, Baby: If you’re a woman who experienced childhood cancer and are hoping to conceive, good news! The Journal of the National Cancer Institute has published a study determining that the likelihood of having a healthy baby is the same as any other non-warrior.

7.

On the Rise: Typically seen in older demographics, esophageal cancer cases in those aged 45 to 64 have nearly doubled since 2012. Symptoms usually arise later, but look out for difficulty swallowing, coughing and heartburn.

8.

Scaling Back: Lung cancer is extremely common but also prone to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. A new model, detailed in the journal Cancer Biomarkers, aims to better identify high-risk and low-risk tumors through MRI and CT scan data.

9.

Bugging Out: Bees, worms, ants—all of these creepy crawlies can help fight cancer. Numerous studies are focusing on bees’ honey as well as worms’ and ants’ sense of smell to detect and treat different cancer types.

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